“Made to Stick” makes it sticky

I get a kick out of it when academics spend a zillion years studying something obvious, quantifying it, categorizing it, slicing and dicing it, deconstructing it and then putting it all back together to prove that in fact everything we already knew is demonstrably true.

Book Review: Made to Stick

Made to Stick

The stolen kidney story.

If you’re still converting oxygen to CO2, you’ve probably heard about the guy who meets an attractive woman in a hotel bar and wakes up in a bathtub of ice. (If you haven’t, well… I dunno – start breathing.)

Made to Stick, by The Brothers Heath explains exactly precisely and intricately why such “stories” are more memorable than “jargon”.

Ok, maybe I’m being a tad harsh.

I actually enjoyed the book. It is well-written. The manner is engaging. The examples are plentiful and helpful. And frankly, the rubric they offer as a way to gauge the “stickiness” of any piece of writing is actually quite useful.

“What is that rubric”, you ask? ( I am so in tune with my readers…)

Duct Tape It To Your Brain

In short, if you want people to understand your message and remember your message, it needs to hit as many of these six hot buttons as possible:

  1. Simpleduct tape
  2. Unexpected
  3. Concrete
  4. Credible
  5. Emotional
  6. Stories

That’s pretty much it.

Good, But Not Great

If you’re a writer who wants to make sure people remember your message, it wouldn’t hurt to absorb the lessons of this book.

I’d call it good but not great.

I’m glad I read it.  I’ll keep it close for reference as I write.

 

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